Why you’re more likely to find the next revolution in a church pew than on Twitter

I spent some of my Thanksgiving holiday catching up on the stack of magazines that had piled up, mostly issues of The New Yorker and Entertainment Weekly (got to keep an eye on the high and low brows). Perhaps the most thought-provoking read I have come across lately is by The New Yorker ’s Malcolm Gladwell , of Blink and Outlier fame, in his New Yorker article “Small Change” on why social media like Twitter and Facebook will not (despite popular opinion) lead to great movements for social change. His reasoning is based on a sociological distinction between “weak-tie” and “strong-tie” activism.

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Why you’re more likely to find the next revolution in a church pew than on Twitter

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2 Comments

  1. Lowell January 31, 2011
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    Link is broken.

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