Concordia Journal, Summer 2017

Browse the interactive version above or download this issue in pdf.

The full catalog of back issues of Concordia Journal (1975-present), along with the indexed volumes of its predecessor Concordia Theological Monthly (1949-1974), are available online at ATLASerials® (ATLAS®). ATLAS is an online full-text collection of major religion and theology journals used by libraries, librarians, scholars, theologians, clergy, and interested laypeople. Most seminary and theological school libraries have access to ATLAS as part of their online database offerings.

Subscribers to Concordia Journal have free access to Concordia Journal on ATLAS through the subscriber log-in provided on the inside front cover of each issue of Concordia Journal.

Alumni of Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, can obtain a free account to ATLAS for Alum, the full-text portion of the ATLAS database, by contacting Donna Church, Concordia Seminary Access Services Librarian, at librarycirc@csl.edu or 314-505-7034. Many other theological school libraries offer similar access to their own alumni.

For more information, to subscribe, or to order individual print copies of Concordia Journal, please contact the editorial office at cj@csl.edu or 314-505-7117.

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4 Comments

  1. Rick Strickert October 22, 2017
    Reply

    In their article, “Concordia Seminary and the Science for Seminaries Grant” in the Concordia Journal, Summer 2017, Charles Arand and Joel Okamoto state (p. 78):

    “Finally, we are using the grant to produce a Lutheran history of science video series for congregations and campus ministries. We want to show that Lutheranism has not been anti-science. Surprisingly, many in our own circles do not realize that Copernicus taught at Wittenberg for a time, that Kepler was a Lutheran, and so on.”

    To the contrary, Nicolas Copernicus, who lived in Poland, never taught at Wittenberg.

    Furthermore, while Kepler (1571-1630) was initially a Lutheran, he was excommunicated from the Lutheran Church on July 31, 1619, for his refusal to unconditionally accept the Formula of Concord (specifically the Real Presence).

    • Scot Wolf December 21, 2017

      Excellent to hear! There are way to many people teaching scientific theory as fact with the intention of discrediting Scripture.

  2. Joseph Fisher December 2, 2017
    Reply

    Thanks for the clarification Carl. I came looking for the discussion promised by the letter sent to my district. It doesn’t seem to be here.

  3. Rick Strickert December 22, 2017
    Reply

    Despite claims (see pages 40 and 83, CJ, Summer 2017) that Copernican heliocentrism was taught at the University of Wittenberg, the Copernicanism taught by Erasmus Reinhold at Wittenberg after Rheticus left in 1542, was taught only as a convenient mathematical tool for astronomical calculations, not as a heliocentric reality that the earth revolves on its axis and orbits, along with other planets, around a fixed sun.

    This “Wittenberg interpretation” of Copernicanism is discussed in Robert Westman’s “The Melanchthon Circle, Rheticus, and the Wittenberg Interpretation of the Copernican Theory” (Isis, Vol. 66, No. 2, Jun., 1975, pp. 164-193). Westman states (pp. 189-190):

    “While there is of course no way to know what might have happened had Rheticus stayed longer [at Wittenberg], it is relevant to note that such a group of followers did not form about him either in Leipzig or in Cracow; nor did either the Narratio prima or De revolutionibus itself have the effect of producing Rheticus-like conversions among those who remained at Wittenberg in the 1540s, 1550s, and 1560s. Although several students were present at Rheticus’ lectures in 1541, after his return from Frombork and before his departure for Leipzig, none of these (Burmeister lists among them Peucer, Schreiber, Stoius, Homelius, Heller, Lauterwalt, Staphylus, and Acontius) were to adopt a strong realist interpretation of the Copernican theory.”

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