Concordia Journal, Summer 2017

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The full catalog of back issues of Concordia Journal (1975-present), along with the indexed volumes of its predecessor Concordia Theological Monthly (1949-1974), are available online at ATLASerials® (ATLAS®). ATLAS is an online full-text collection of major religion and theology journals used by libraries, librarians, scholars, theologians, clergy, and interested laypeople. Most seminary and theological school libraries have access to ATLAS as part of their online database offerings.

Subscribers to Concordia Journal have free access to Concordia Journal on ATLAS through the subscriber log-in provided on the inside front cover of each issue of Concordia Journal.

Alumni of Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, can obtain a free account to ATLAS for Alum, the full-text portion of the ATLAS database, by contacting Beth Hoeltke, Concordia Seminary Public Services Administrator, at hoeltkeb@csl.edu or 314-505-7031. Many other theological school libraries offer similar access to their own alumni.

For more information, to subscribe, or to order individual print copies of Concordia Journal, please contact the editorial office at cj@csl.edu or 314-505-7117.

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2 Comments

  1. Carl Vehse October 22, 2017
    Reply

    In their article, “Concordia Seminary and the Science for Seminaries Grant” in the Concordia Journal, Summer 2017, Charles Arand and Joel Okamoto state (p. 78):

    “Finally, we are using the grant to produce a Lutheran history of science video series for congregations and campus ministries. We want to show that Lutheranism has not been anti-science. Surprisingly, many in our own circles do not realize that Copernicus taught at Wittenberg for a time, that Kepler was a Lutheran, and so on.”

    To the contrary, Nicolas Copernicus, who lived in Poland, never taught at Wittenberg.

    Furthermore, while Kepler (1571-1630) was initially a Lutheran, he was excommunicated from the Lutheran Church on July 31, 1619, for his refusal to unconditionally accept the Formula of Concord (specifically the Real Presence).

  2. Joseph Fisher 13 days ago
    Reply

    Thanks for the clarification Carl. I came looking for the discussion promised by the letter sent to my district. It doesn’t seem to be here.

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