Word and Work: Gibbs on Matthew

In Word and Work: An Intersection, Dale A. Meyer interviews Jeffrey Gibbs, professor of exegetical theology, about the recent publication of Matthew 21:1-28:20 in the Concordia Commentary series for Concordia Publishing House (CPH). The volume concludes Gibbs’ trilogy of commentaries on the Book of Matthew. The volume begins with the triumphal entry; journeys through Jesus’ betrayal, death and resurrection; and culminates in the Great Commission. As with his other volumes on Matthew, Gibbs presents his own direct translation of the text in addition to textual notes and commentary.

Find the book at the CPH website: https://www.cph.org/p-32826-matthew-211-2820-concordia-commentary.aspx.

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1 Comment

  1. Phil Bohlken July 15, 2019
    Reply

    Thank you for the very interesting Interview with Dr. Gibbs. One day in 2015 it struck me Jesus was Jewish and the disciples were, too. When they asked Jesus to teach them to pray, the prayer He gave them used words likely invested with meaning from the Old Testament. I found and downloaded Saulkinson-Ginsburg’s Hebrew New Testament and looked at key vocables by means of Harrison, Archer, and Waltke’s Theological Wordbook. The Lord’s Prayer became richer. An emphasis on the God Who wants to know us in a covenant comes through. In regard to the Sixth Petition, I have wondered if we might be asking God to help us live so faithfully that He never finds it necessary to put us to a hard test to see if we are genuine as He did with Abraham and the sacrifice of Isaac. I have used that study I did for Sunday morning Bible classes when I serve as the guest preacher someplace, and it is received well.

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