To Be In the Word

In Word and Work: An Intersection, Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, President Emeritus Dr. Dale A. Meyer sits down with Dr. Philip Penhallegon, who became professor of exegetical theology in July 2020. Penhallegon joined the Seminary from Concordia University, Ann Arbor, Mich. (CUAA), where he taught biblical languages and Bible content. His areas of interest include the books of Esther and Nehemiah, and biblical Hebrew and Greek. “The task of an exegete is to read and to read very carefully the text,” Penhallegon says. “This is the task I wanted to do and this is the task I get to do.” The two men discuss theology and the Old Testament throughout the episode. Penhallegon says he exhorts his students — future pastors — to create time to read Scripture. “Set aside the time, put a note on your door, ‘In the Word’,’’ he says. “Ask the congregation to exhort you to spend time in the Word. That’s our task, to be in the Word. When we’re in it, then we can bring it and apply it to lives of ourselves and the people around us.”

In the audio version, hear a recent chapel sermon from Penhallegon. You can download the episode in video (mp4) or audio (mp3) format at the Word and Work Scholar page: https://scholar.csl.edu/wordandwork/82/.

Word and Work: An Intersection is a video and audio program providing a behind-the-scenes look at ministry where everyday life and God’s Word meet. It is broadcast on KFUO Radio every Thursday at 2:00 pm CT.

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