“O Sacred Head, Now Wounded”

A Concordia Seminary, St. Louis choir, led by Director of Music Arts Dr. James F. Marriott, sings “O Sacred Head, Now Wounded” (Lutheran Service Book 449) Feb. 9, 2021, from the balcony of the Chapel of St. Timothy and St. Titus.

About this hymn, Dr. Marriott writes:

Our series of hymn recordings celebrates the rich intersection of music and theology in our Lutheran heritage. Here, the St. Louis Lutheran Chorale sings the beautiful Bach harmonization of O Sacred Head, Now Wounded. Indeed, we prayerfully ponder the passion of our Lord Jesus Christ: “What language shall I borrow to thank Thee, dearest friend…” We invite you to meditate on the text with us (LSB 449), or even to sing along as you listen!

Learn more about the musical offerings at the Seminary at https://www.csl.edu/campus-life/music-arts/.

An archive of past musical performances is available at https://scholar.csl.edu/music_arts/.

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