An Easter Toccata

Concordia Seminary, St. Louis’ Director of Music Arts Dr. James F. Marriott plays an organ work famous for its use as an Easter postlude.

About this work, Dr. Marriott writes:

Though not written for Easter (at least to my knowledge), this famous organ work—“Toccata” from Symphony no. 5 by Charles-Marie Widor—has been a popular choice for Easter postlude by many organists worldwide. Known succinctly as “Widor’s toccata” (though he in fact wrote many other toccatas!), this piece carries the joy of Easter into our hearts and minds. The mighty Casavant organ at Concordia Seminary is a wonderful instrument for the performance of Widor and other French romantic organ literature.

Learn more about the musical offerings at the Seminary at https://www.csl.edu/campus-life/music-arts/.

An archive of past musical performances is available at https://scholar.csl.edu/music_arts/.

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