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The Supreme Court, a "minister," and the issue of trust

Submitted by on January 13, 2012 – 8:00 pm2 Comments

The Supreme Court ruled unanimously in perhaps the most significant case involving religious liberty and the separation of church and state in decades. But it got me thinking about more than liberty.

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The Supreme Court, a "minister," and the issue of trust

2 Comments »

  • Andrew Bartelt says:

    It has certainly been a worthy observation in these recent years that our Concordia Plans, for as good as they are, have no provision for “unemployment.” There are too many real life stories of church workers, from parish staffs to teachers with long careers of faithful service, from pastors to staff and clergy who serve in district and synodical offices, who are simply “let go,” most commonly for financial reasons, so prevalent in this age of “RIF,” and sometimes with very minimal severance. That’s a very dark side example of what should more positively pick up your theme of treating church’s workers with “with fairness, decency, and respect,” not to mention support in good times and in bad.

  • Terry Adamson says:

    Thank you, Travis, for articulating what has been turning over and over in my mind since the Supreme Court decision was release. Actually, I began to think about these matters when I first read about the case and took the time to read the pleadings. And thank you Andy Bartelt for your comments.

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