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4 Comments

  1. pete lange August 20, 2012
    Reply

    brilliant – thanks travis

  2. Travis Scholl August 24, 2012
    Reply

    Thank you, Pete.

  3. David Knefelkamp September 7, 2012
    Reply

    I realize I may be a little late on this. But I really did like your point Travis. We search outer space and look to force the imprint of humanity upon it. This question has seeped into science fiction as well. In Star Trek VI, there is the discussion on human rights violations, and how this is discriminating against obviously non-human species. Even in Star Trek Next Generation they had episodes which talked about Humanoid species. Because unlike Star Trek original series most of the species they encountered were humanoid. Now most of this was probably costuming and design problems, but even in Star Wars universe there are a significant amount of similar illusions to the human face being put upon any kind of life we may find. Or if not human, earthly face upon anything we discover. God had Adam name all the animals of the earth, so Mankind still names everything it seems to find in the universe with the exception of God (even though we may try).

    • Travis Scholl September 7, 2012

      Nice connections, David, with Star Trek and the naming of the animals in Genesis. I’ve begun to think that this episode in Genesis – often dwarfed by the mega-accounts of creation and fall – bears a lot of meaning for how we can understand the human condition. In our “naming” are we open to the uniqueness of the other in the encounter, to let the name speak authentically to who they are, whether human or non-human? Or is the name we give projecting our own ideology onto their existence? Given our sinful human nature, I’m afraid is much more often the latter.

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