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Telling God’s Story
May 23, 2014 – 9:00 am | No Comment

In conjunction with the Spring 2014 issue of Concordia Journal, here is David Schmitt’s opening plenary presentation at the 2013 Theological Symposium. The Symposium theme was “From the Creation to the New Creation: Seeing All Things in Light of the Entire Story.”

You can download the video, along with videos of other Symposium plenaries and sectionals, on iTunes U.

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Proper 13 • Isaiah 55:1–5 • August 3, 2014
July 22, 2014 – 10:00 am | No Comment

By David Schmitt
In 1538, the Dance of Death made its way into the Bible.
In their printing of the Old Testament, the Treschel Brothers included Life after the Fall, a woodcut by Hans Holbein. In his woodcut, Holbein pictured …

Tucson and Port-au-Prince: thinking about words, images, and violence
January 13, 2011 – 9:26 pm | One Comment
Tucson and Port-au-Prince: thinking about words, images, and violence

WILL WE? (Photo credit: Jim Wilson/The New York Times) A stunningly violent shooting in Tucson, Arizona, and we are talking again about violence and violent images. And the war of words has begun. I have to confess that I am frequently bewildered by the violent use of violent metaphors in our public speaking

Theological Symposium 2010
January 10, 2011 – 11:57 am | One Comment
Theological Symposium 2010

View video from “Scripture and the Church: Formative or Formality?” – the 2010 Theological Symposium at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis.

Classic 99 is online and expanding
January 6, 2011 – 3:51 pm | One Comment
Classic 99 is online and expanding

As it happens, when Classic 99 went off the air in July 2010, it never died. Classic99.com continues to live stream its vast catalog of classical and sacred music online, just as it did when it broadcast on the FM dial. Matter of fact, I’m listening to it as I write this post, and I’m even hearing the familiar voices of former KFUO-FM announcers, now volunteers for the Internet station. And The Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod has announced that the Synod’s Board of Directors voted to provide an additional $193,000 through at least mid-2012 “not only to continue but to improve the way it provides quality classical and sacred music to listeners via the Internet.” And, evidently, both the online station and its listener base are expanding.

Scientifically Demonstrable . . . Sort of
January 3, 2011 – 9:59 am | 12 Comments
Scientifically Demonstrable . . . Sort of

What is Truth?

Words, Words, Words
December 21, 2010 – 6:00 am | 7 Comments
Words, Words, Words

Hamlet could not have dreamed of this

Elizabeth Edwards, Happiness, and God
December 14, 2010 – 6:17 am | One Comment
Elizabeth Edwards, Happiness, and God

. . . one more curious snowflake in the information blizzard in which we live.

Macy’s, Handel’s Messiah, and a random act of hyperspace
December 13, 2010 – 7:57 pm | No Comment

By now, it has been making the email and Facebook rounds many times over: The Opera Company of Philadelphia hides in the Center City Philadephia Macy’s on Saturday, October 30, and during the height of the busy shopping day breaks into an “impromptu” performance of the Hallelujah chorus from Handel’s “Messiah.” It was a “Random Act of Culture,” funded by the Knight Foundation as a campaign to bring “classical artists out of the performance halls, into the streets – and our everyday lives.” The only reason we know about it—and have “seen” it—is because it was posted on YouTube. And in the weeks since it has gone, as they say, viral. Three years ago, I wrote in a more academic venue about the experience of Radio City Music Hall’s Christmas Spectacular as an experience of cultural “transgression.” It seems that a similar…

Bible Translations and the Christmas Story
December 13, 2010 – 12:02 pm | 5 Comments
Bible Translations and the Christmas Story

Something about Mary

Why you’re more likely to find the next revolution in a church pew than on Twitter
November 30, 2010 – 10:19 pm | 2 Comments
Why you’re more likely to find the next revolution in a church pew than on Twitter

I spent some of my Thanksgiving holiday catching up on the stack of magazines that had piled up, mostly issues of The New Yorker and Entertainment Weekly (got to keep an eye on the high and low brows). Perhaps the most thought-provoking read I have come across lately is by The New Yorker ’s Malcolm Gladwell , of Blink and Outlier fame, in his New Yorker article “Small Change” on why social media like Twitter and Facebook will not (despite popular opinion) lead to great movements for social change. His reasoning is based on a sociological distinction between “weak-tie” and “strong-tie” activism.

Reflections on a Soil Motif
November 17, 2010 – 8:29 pm | No Comment
Reflections on a Soil Motif

Not too long ago scholars spoke of the story of salvation in the bible as “salvation- history .” In part this phrase meant that God carried out his work of salvation in history through a historical people and through historical events. This distinguished Christianity from so-called nature religions that too closely identified their gods with nature. We called that pantheism