History as Fad

Japanese pop culture has profoundly affected America. You probably recognize the words anime and manga, and you might even know that otaku (nerd or geek) is used to describe Japanese superfans of the diverse genres of animation and their characters. I know more about all of this than I used to thanks to my friend Kit Born. (Although when I was about 7, I did get up early every morning to watch Speed Racer without knowing I was on the cutting edge of a major trend.)

Now the latest fad to come out of Japan is “history girls.” Young women are getting into Japanese history. As the seminary’s resident medieval history nerd, I think I like this trend. I am imagining America embracing this fad; I picture myself watching the emergence of a generation of history nerds, both women and men.

On the other hand, the “history girls” also dress up like the characters they admire. I’m not so sure about that part. I wouldn’t mind a few Luther imitators here and there on campus, but I don’t want to encounter a gang of Walther wanna-bes in the quad any time soon! (You can see why in the picture here—>)

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1 Comment

  1. Will Schumacher April 14, 2010
    Reply

    I heard this NPR story, too, and it sounded to me like these “history girls” are really rather serious about history — a far cry from the sometimes strange world of Renaissance Faires and the <a href="http://www.sca.org/"Society for Creative Anachronism.
    Important Note: The upcoming Walther Round Table Conference will NOT include a Walther look-alike contest!

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