John Witte on religion and human rights language

In case you haven’t gotten to know him already, here is a fascinating interview of John Witte, Jr. by theologian Miroslav Volf on the topic of human rights language, its religious foundations and connotations. Of course, as the video states upfront, we might as well mention for our part too that “the views and opinions expressed…do not necessarily reflect the views” of Concordia Seminary, St. Louis.

Witte will be one of the featured speakers at Concordia Seminary’s 2012 Theological Symposium, entitled “Doing Justice: The Church’s Faith in Action.” For more information on the Symposium and to register, click here, or contact Linda Nehring at ce@csl.edu or 314-505-7486. You can also register online for the Symposium.

Also note: registrants to the Symposium will receive a gratis copy of the book A Cup of Cold Water: A Look at Biblical Charity, edited by Robert Rosin and Charles Arand.

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1 Comment

  1. Kristian September 2, 2012
    Reply

    Obviously an astounding intellect parsing an incredibly important topic that often nags at the back of my brain.

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