Preacher’s Roundtable: Preaching Luke, Part 1

The three-year lectionary offers pastors and people the opportunity to meditate upon a specific gospel throughout the liturgical year.  This year, in series C, we read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest the Gospel of Luke.  In preparation for preaching from Luke for Series C, Dr. David Schmitt hosts a conversation with Dr. Jeff Kloha and Dr. Jeff Oschwald (who is writing the CPH commentary on Acts) about the themes and preaching possibilities we will encounter in Luke.  Come to the table, enter the conversation, and enjoy.

Part 2, on preaching Luke in the non-festival half of the church year, will be posted as we approach Easter.

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4 Comments

  1. Don December 12, 2012
    Reply

    They mentioned that Luke 1-2 are almost Old Testament writings and basically skipped over them to start the semester of our Lord with the Baptism. I would like to have heard a discussion about the unique Christmas and Epiphany material. Since Jan. 6 is a Sunday this year what do we do with the wise men?

    • Don December 29, 2012

      Sorry about the mind mush. Why do the Christmas and Epiphany narratives vary so much? Why would Luke skip the chance to show the reversals/salvation with the story of the wise men and the trip to Egypt? What does this have to do with the synoptic tradition? Why are there 12 days of Christmas? We can sing Easter songs for 50 days but if you try to celebrate Epiphany on Epiphany rather than in the children’s program everyone thinks you have taken things too far. I guess the question that brings it together is What is the rush to be done with Christmas??

  2. Trackback: Concordia Theology » Preacher’s Roundtable: Preaching Luke, Part 2

  3. Josh March 23, 2016
    Reply

    I’m unable to view the item (which was going to be very timely for this week..)

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