2015 Theological Symposium – Schedule of Events

2015 Symposium headerIn Remembrance of Me:
Memory and the Life of Faith

September 22-23, 2015
Working Schedule

TUESDAY, September 22, 2015

7:45 – 8:30 a.m.

REGISTRATION
Wyneken 101 – all pre-registered, faculty and students
Coffee/refreshments in SIECK HALL FOYER

8:30 a.m.

Service of the Word
The Chapel of St. Timothy and St. Titus

9:15 a.m.

REFRESHMENTS in SIECK HALL FOYER
Registration reopens in Wyneken 101

9:45 a.m.

WELCOME and Introduction
Why Memory is Always More Important than We Think
Joel Okamoto
Wyneken Hall, Clara and Spencer Werner Auditorium

10:15 a.m.

PLENARY – Brain, Memory and Mind: The Neural Structures that Allow Us to Remember
Steve Joordens
Reflections – Joel Okamoto
Wyneken Hall, Clara and Spencer Werner Auditorium

11:45 p.m.     LUNCH

1:00 – 2:30 p.m.

PLENARY – You Are What You Remember: How Our Memories Define Who We Are and Support Our Effective Functioning
Steve Joordens
Reflections Bruce Hartung
Wyneken Hall, Clara and Spencer Werner Auditorium

 Break – Coffee Only

2:45 – 4:15 p.m.

PLENARY – The Communal Dimension of Memory Formation and Retention
Charlotte Linde
Reflections – Tony Cook
Wyneken Hall, Clara and Spencer Werner Auditorium

4:30 p.m.     GEMÜTLICHKEIT

BUFFET RECEPTION (for those who have full paid registration or purchased extra ticket) CPH Sponsored
East Courtyard

6:00 p.m.

Discussion Tables in Koburg Hall – snacks and drinks

7:30 p.m.

Dr. Jack Dean Kingsbury Chair of New Testament Theology Annual Lecture
Return to the Text: Literary Criticism and Beyond
Rev. Dr. James W. Voelz, the designated occupant of the chair
Wyneken Hall, Clara and Spencer Werner Auditorium

*     *     *

WEDNESDAY, September 23, 2015

8:00 a.m.

Coffee/break items served in Sieck Foyer

8:30 – 9:30 a.m.

CHAPEL – Service of the Word
Chapel of St. Timothy and St. Titus

Coffee/break items served in Sieck Foyer

10:00 – 11:00 a.m.

Sectionals

Track I – Theological Reflection

Remembrance as Reception: The Lord’s Supper in the Pauline Tradition
Mark Siefrid
Wyneken Hall, Clara and Spencer Werner Auditorium

Track II – Pastoral Ministry

Grieving as a Neurological Activity
Bruce Hartung
Sieck 202

Track III – Congregational Ministry

Zikkaron: Liturgical Remembrance and Christian Identity
Tony Cook
Sieck 201

Track IV – Open Sectionals

Michael Zeigler
Wyneken 205

11:00 – 12:00 p.m.

Sectionals

Track I – Theological Reflection

When God Remembers
Paul Raabe
Wyneken 206

Track II – Pastoral Ministry

Ministering to Alzheimer’s Patients
Rick Marrs
Wyneken Hall, Clara and Spencer Werner Auditorium

Track III – Congregational Ministry

Catechesis and Memory
Jason Broge
Wyneken 103

Track IV – Open Sectionals

12:15 – 1:15p.m.     LUNCH

1:30 – 2:30 p.m.

Sectionals

Track I – Theological Reflection

Memory in the Fathers: Memoria Sui – Memoria Dei
Joel Elowsky
Wyneken 102

Track II – Pastoral Ministry

To Forgive is Not to Forget
Mark Rockenbach
Sieck 205

Track III – Congregational Ministry

Helping People Remember the Sermon Beyond the Parking Lot
Glenn Nielsen
Wyneken Hall, Clara and Spencer Werner Auditorium

Track IV – Open Sectionals

2:30– 3:00 p.m.

Wrap Up with Joel Okamoto
Wyneken Hall, Clara and Spencer Werner Auditorium

3:15 p.m.

Itinerarium
Wyneken Hall, Clara and Spencer Werner Auditorium

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2 Comments

  1. Rev. Richard A. Bolland August 27, 2015
    Reply

    Dear Concordia,

    Once again it would seem that STL has an aversion to discussing issues related to theology at its theological symposium. How sad for an institution steeped and founded on orthodox Lutheran theology. While studying psychology may be interesting, in an age when orthodox theology is under attack, even within our own Synod, there would seem to be a far better option than simply talking about the importance of human memory. Leave that to the medical people.

    If you want to host a conference on catechesis, that also speaks about the importance of memory work (which many pastors have abandoned in the LCMS), that would be a worthy conference, but catechesis is far more than memory work.

    Until STL finally realizes it is a theological institution and not an institution on pop psychology and current cultural accommodation, I will have no interest in attending this or future symposia even though STL is far closer to me geographically than Fort Wayne.

    • Rev. Josh Leigeber September 16, 2015

      Dear Rev. Bolland,

      You cannot long have orthodox Lutheran theology if no one remembers it. You can’t have catechesis. The “lex orandi, lex credendi” of the liturgy ceases to be.

      I am one who is very interested in the faithful confession and proclamation of orthodox Lutheran theology, but, as such, I find your comments and accusations to be thoroughly misguided.

      If you’ll notice, while day one of the symposium sets up the topic by demonstrating the nature and importance of memory, day two is all theology. What a wonderful thing to make sure everyone is on the same page and understands the topic to be discussed before trying to apply it! Day two: Remembrance in the Lord’s Supper, Liturgy, Catechesis, Pastoral Care, the Church Fathers, Forgiveness within the Body of Christ, Sermons, etc.

      It seems to me that “STL” does indeed realize it is a theological institution. Indeed, it is one that continues to form faithful orthodox pastors for Christ’s Church. Recognizing this, I hope you now have renewed interest in attending this and future symposia. I recognize it’s a little late in the game for planning the trip, but maybe I’ll see you there. Peace, brother.

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