Conversations in Preaching: Dr. Dean Nadasdy

Dr. David Schmitt, the Gregg H. Benidt Memorial Professor of Homiletics and Literature at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, chats with Lutheran theology scholar Dr. Dean Nadasdy about his recent publication of The Beautiful Sermon: Image and the Aesthetics of Preaching. The book is the first title in The Conversations in Preaching Series from Concordia Seminary Press, the publishing arm of Concordia Seminary. In The Beautiful Sermon, Nadasdy sets preaching in the context of aesthetic theology. He highlights preachers who have contributed significantly to aesthetic theology such as Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther and Jonathan Edwards. Nadasdy explores seven elements that contribute to the beautiful sermon and the various approaches to using images in preaching. Read more about the book.

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