Christian Nationalism – Dr. Joel Biermann and Dr. David Adams

Tangible: Theology Learned and Lived explores the ways in which theology permeates all aspects of life. Through conversations with the faculty of Concordia Seminary, we will challenge you to deepen your theology and live out your faith in Christ. In each episode Jessica Bordeleau hosts discussions with a variety of guests on a variety of topics. The focus is different in every episode, but always pointing to the tangible intersection of faith and daily life. Theology is both learned and lived.

The topic of Christian nationalism is hot in the media. How does our theology influence our political involvement? In this episode Jessica Bordeleau talks with Dr. Joel Biermann and Dr. David Adams, professors at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis. The discussion focuses on how Christians fulfill their vocation as citizens as well as their call to be the church. “I think Luther is brilliant in his understanding of the two realms, and I’ve been frustrated that so few Lutherans seem to really grasp the depth of it,” says Dr. Joel Biermann. “It’s one of the most substantial areas where we see the tangible reality of theology hitting life.”

You can find more episodes of Tangible: Theology Learned and Lived on CSL Scholar and across all major podcast platforms. Check it out!

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3 Comments

  1. Tom Koenig 16 days ago
    Reply

    My early morning prayer was open. “give me clarity and peace with the current world situation“. I saw the email and noted that there were some pretty heavy Weight Lutheran professors. Going to comment on Christian nationalism. I thought wow that’ll be heavy. But I thought maybe I’ll learn something. I listened to it, and, I was given a greater sense of peace. I’m glad I listened to the podcast and will do so again. Thank you.

  2. Robert K. 16 days ago
    Reply

    I would say that the current news media’s concern and definition about “Christian nationalism” is to enforce a “Quietism ‘ that the speakers of this podcast referred to. At this juncture in history, “Quietism” is far more a threat than a remote implementation of utopian “Christian nationalism”.

  3. Justin 7 days ago
    Reply

    Read Luther’s works yourself. It’s very common for people to re-interpret Luther to fit their own objectives in stark contrast with what Luther actually wrote throughout his life. This is complicated further when dealing with Lutherans cherry picking Luther since they will defend their cherry picking by exclaiming that Luther is no infallible pope! All this means is that there is the sudden realization that “Luther would agree with me on this” is disingenuous. It’s just misusing Luther’s name to give a false sense of legitimacy to one’s own views rather than accurately portraying Luther’s views as evident in the whole of his works. What I would really like to see is a comparison of Biermann’s Luther, Christian Nationalism, and Luther’s On the Jews and their Lies. That would make for an interesting discussion of Luther, Christian Nationalism, and the doctrine of two kingdoms.

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